Are you ready to change the world?

Creating innovative strategies for business and brands

“Gamechangers” are disruptive and innovative, start-ups and corporates, in every sector and region, reshaping our world. They are more ambitious, with stretching vision and enlightened purpose. They see markets as kaleidoscopes of infinite possibilities, assembling and defining them to their advantage. They find their own space, then shape it to their advantage. Most of all they have great ideas. They out-think their competition, thinking bigger and different. They don’t believe in being slightly cheaper or slightly better. That is a short-term game of diminishing returns. 

  1.     Play … the game, change the game.

Today’s brands and businesses are playing a new game. They recognise that the steady state has been replaced by a zigzag world, where ideas shake up every market, and winners create the future in their own vision.

  1.     Change … world-changing, game-changing

Discontinuous change in markets requires disruptive action. Power shifts and global trends drive exponential change and new possibilities. Incrementalism is not enough to win this new game.

  1.     Win … the Gamechangers, and what they do

There is a new breed of business, changing the world right now, bu thinking bigger and smarter, winning in new ways. Do you have what it takes to change the game? Are you ready?

This book is about you, and how you can change your game. In part one we explore the 10 dimensions in which you can achieve this by thinking differently. In part two we look at the 100 companies, chosen by you, who demonstrate these new practices. In part three you’ll find the change maps, the toolkits for your success.  

Are you ready to change the world?

Creating innovative strategies for business and brands

“Gamechangers” are disruptive and innovative, start-ups and corporates, in every sector and region, reshaping our world. They are more ambitious, with stretching vision and enlightened purpose. They see markets as kaleidoscopes of infinite possibilities, assembling and defining them to their advantage. They find their own space, then shape it to their advantage. Most of all they have great ideas. They out-think their competition, thinking bigger and different. They don’t believe in being slightly cheaper or slightly better. That is a short-term game of diminishing returns.

  1.     Play … the game, change the game.

Today’s brands and businesses are playing a new game. They recognise that the steady state has been replaced by a zigzag world, where ideas shake up every market, and winners create the future in their own vision.

  1.     Change … world-changing, game-changing

Discontinuous change in markets requires disruptive action. Power shifts and global trends drive exponential change and new possibilities. Incrementalism is not enough to win this new game.

  1.     Win … the Gamechangers, and what they do

There is a new breed of business, changing the world right now, bu thinking bigger and smarter, winning in new ways. Do you have what it takes to change the game? Are you ready?

This book is about you, and how you can change your game. In part one we explore the 10 dimensions in which you can achieve this by thinking differently. In part two we look at the 100 companies, chosen by you, who demonstrate these new practices. In part three you’ll find the change maps, the toolkits for your success.  

Transformation is a “significant, lasting and irreversible change in value creation logic” … where 25-30% of revenues come from new areas … typically growing faster than the core, and becoming the new core … and it typically takes 7-10 years.

I work with the excellent Christian Rangen from Strategy Tools who has produced this great CEO Handbook to get you transforming … Together we deliver fabulous transformational programs for executives and their organisations.

We also create fantastic simulation-based learning experiences. Imagine you are the exec team seeking to transform the mobility sector. What’s your strategy? Where will you focus? What’s your business model? How will you outthink Tesla, and create $50 billion?

“In the beginning I looked around and could not find quite the car I dreamed of. So I decided to build it myself.“

Ferdinand Porsche founded the company in 1931, based in Kronenstraße 24 in the centre of Stuttgart. Initially, Porsche offered car design and consulting services, but did not build any cars under its own name. One of the first projects was from the German government to design a car for the people; that is, a VolkswagenThis resulted in the Volkswagen Beetle, one of the most successful car designs of all time. The Porsche 64 was developed in 1939 using many components from the Beetle.

In 1948, the Porsche brand was created. Later that year, the first Porsche model, the Porsche 356, was introduced with less than 100 cars produced the year after. Other models, like the 550 Spyder, were introduced later on, and the company grew immensely.

Volkswagen and Porsche have a long history together, of investments and management and collaborations. They merged in 2011. Volkswagen Group became the parent company, with a wide range of  luxury car brands, also including Audi, Bentley, Bugatti, and Lamborghini.

Volkswagen is considering spinning off its profitable Porsche division into a separate company with its own stock listing. The transaction would help the German automaker raise money to invest in electric vehicles while also potentially returning more control of the high-performance carmaker to descendants of its founder.

Anne Wojcicki wants to change the face of healthcare. 23andMe, her personal genetics testing company based in Mountain View, California and part funded by her ex-husband, Google’s co-founder Sergey Brin.

By simply taking and mailing a saliva example from your home, and receiving analysis and interpretation within a week, 23andMe enables people to learn about their inherited health traits and genetic links to certain diseases. With around $120m investment, 23andMe can now offer 244 reports on health and personal traits, as well as genealogy and ancestry information that people can share socially all for $99.

For a price equivalent to a new pair of running shoes, the self-testing package is now accessible to millions of consumers, curious to understand the secrets locked in their DNA, and what it might mean for them. Imagine how it can change people’s lifestyles – prompting new diets and fitness regimes – as well as transforming insurance policies and healthcare planning.

It also enables 23andMe to create the world’s largest private database of genetic information, to explore and distribute this rich knowledge bank (around 90% of patients are happy for their aggregated data to be used). The results can be used in research conducted by Wojcicki’s team, plus pharmaceutical and healthcare partners to drive innovation and focus investment.

In 2018, 23andMe partnered with pharmaceutical company GSK to use test results from 5 million customers to design new drugs, and based on the success, GSK invested $300 million in Wojcicki’s business. In 2020, they announced their partnership’s first clinical trial: a joint asset being co-developed by the two companies for cancer treatment.

In 2021, 23andMe merged with Sir Richard Branson’s special-purpose acquisition company (SPAC), known as VG Acquisition Corp, in a $3.5 billion transaction, to take the business public. Later in the same year, 23andMe aquired Lemonaid Health, a telehealth company, for $400 million. A new business model is rapidly taking shape. Compared to the old world, where drugs were made generically, and pharma companies never connected with patients, 23andMe is now fundamentally disrupting that model.

Uber Technologies Inc’s explosive growth and constant controversy make it one of the most fascinating companies to emerge over the past decade.

Uber’s story began in Paris in 2008. Two friends, Travis Kalanick and Garrett Camp, were attending LeWeb, an annual tech conference The Economist describes as “where revolutionaries gather to plot the future.”

In 2007, both men had sold startups they co-founded for large sums. Kalanick sold Red Swoosh to Akamai Technologies for $19 million while Camp sold StumbleUpon to eBay for $75 million.

The concept for Uber was born one winter night during the conference when the pair was unable to get a cab. Uber was founded on a single idea: “What if you could request a ride from your phone?” Initially, the idea was for a timeshare limo service that could be ordered via an app. After the conference, the entrepreneurs went their separate ways. However, when Camp returned to San Francisco, he continued to be fixated on the idea and bought the domain name UberCab.com.

In 2009, Camp was still CEO of StumbleUpon, but he began working on a prototype for UberCab as a side project. By summer of that year, Camp had persuaded Kalanick to join as UberCab’s “chief incubator.” The service was tested in New York in early 2010 using only three cars, and the official launch took place in San Francisco in May.

The ease and simplicity of ordering a car fueled the app’s rising popularity. With the tap of a button, a ride could be ordered, a GPS identified the location, and the cost was automatically charged to the card on the user account. The San Francisco-based startup quickly became one of the hottest companies and grew quickly. The first Uber ride was requested in 2010 and less than two years later, in 2011, Uber had already launched internationally in Paris, where the idea for it first took root.

In 2007 Brian  Chesky and Joe Gebbia were broke and looking to raise money to make their rent in San Francisco.

They decided to rent out air mattresses in their apartment to attendees of a conference because all the hotels were booked. They called their service “Air Bed and Breakfast.”

In a few years, this small experiment would create the hotel industry disruptor Airbnb.

Jeff Bezos’s legacy is phenomenal. Since throwing in his Wall Street job in 1994 and heading west towards Seattle in a VW campervan to launch an online bookstore (which he initially named Cadabra, before changing it to Amazon), his journey has been unique.

Nobody else has

  • Grown a business from zero to $1.5 trillion market cap
  • Turned the biggest cost centres into profit centres
  • Generated recurring revenues from 82% of US homes
  • Hired over half a million people in 12 months

Each year as Amazon CEO, Bezos would write an annual shareholder letter. They became masterclasses in business strategy, and insights into how to achieve success as a leader, in a world of relentless tech-fuelled change.

Some of Bezos’ key themes included

  • The importance of a Day 1 mindset
  • Why “it’s all about the long term”
  • What it really means to be customer obsessed
  • How to start new businesses and create significant organic growth in an already successful company
  • Why culture is an imperative
  • How a willingness to fail is closely connected to innovation

 

I’ve spent the last 25 years facilitating workshops, team events, conferences and executive retreats all around the world.

  • How do you effectively engage everyone?
  • Which types of technique works best, for who and when?
  • What really delivers the best outcomes?

Be the challenge a new corporate strategy, innovative ideas, problem solving, or new learning, there are a huge number of facilitation options, formats and techniques to get the most out of people, time and being together.

Here are some of the more popular facilitation techniques:

  • Fish Bowl
  • World Cafe
  • Open Space
  • Speed Geeking
  • Model Building
  • People Bingo
  • Future Backwards
  • Wicked Questions

… and hundreds more, which you can explore in the attachment, click below.

On top of this, it’s about setting the right mindset to explore, imagine and engage. This is about

  • Context and content – the theme and structure of the event, from the title and objectives, through to inspirational ideas and insights to get people thinking, including speakers and leaders.
  • Surrounding and stimulus – the venue, activities and format – from mountain climbing to team projects which accelerate internal developments or direct actions, plus music, food and more.

In the last 25 years we’ve done some amazing events – form the K2 Challenge with an investment bank, to cruising the Mediterranean with tech execs, underground caving and rockstar song writing!

Email me at peterfisk@peterfisk.com to explore how we can design and deliver a great workshop or event, together.